Recent Posts

THE TRAIN TRAVAILS

THE TRAIN TRAVAILS

©️Dr. Aparna Govil Bhasker Mumbai locals…. Rightly known as the lifeline of this city of dreams. Mumbai will not be Mumbai, if it were not for its local train network. For some, it’s a necessity and for others more privileged, it’s a choice. But no 

THE YELLOW CANDY

THE YELLOW CANDY

©️ Dr. Aparna Govil Bhasker He saw me standing lost in my thoughts, He noticed that I didn’t ask for a coffee today, His old experienced eyes perceived that I was not my usual self, He waited for the moment when I would look at 

THE EXPERIENCED DOCTOR

THE EXPERIENCED DOCTOR

©️Dr. Aparna Govil Bhasker

This morning as I was getting ready to go to the hospital, I looked in the mirror and a streak of grey hair caught my attention. I paused for a moment and a bittersweet emotion passed through me. As a doctor, grey hair bring in a lot of validation from patients. Grey hair signify experience and who wouldn’t want to see an #experienced doctor. Rather who wants to see an inexperienced doctor! I guess no one.

But what does “experience” mean in its true context?

Experience means years of rigorous training to hone our skills to be able to diagnose and treat illnesses.

Experience means to be able to effectively ease physical and mental pain and save lives.

Experience means understanding, guiding and providing support to hundreds and thousands of people day in and day out for years on end.

Experience means to be able to communicate effectively and give out the correct information without taking away hope.

Experience means doing our job and doing it well consistently.

Experience could also mean, exposing ourselves to deadly infections in order to save someone else’s life.

Experience means accepting that sometimes the worst patients may get better and the most unexpected ones may get worse.

Experience means knowing that sometimes despite all our efforts, things may still go wrong.

Experience means realizing that #nature is the third element between a doctor and a patient.

Experience means accepting that this third element, that is nature, will always remain more powerful than any advances in medical science.

Experience is finally a lesson in humility ….. and if we have learnt that, we are truly experienced.

Dr Aparna Govil Bhasker

DOWN THE MEMORY LANE

DOWN THE MEMORY LANE

My father is known in the family for his humongous collection of stamps and rare first day covers. All through my childhood, I waited for the day when he would pass this precious collection to his first born child, which is obviously me! Well, as 

GRATITUDE

GRATITUDE

©️Dr. Aparna Govil Bhasker I love sitting around in the surgical lounge for a bit after the surgery is over. It is usually here that we end up meeting our colleagues and have some light banter. We talk about this and that and then get 

“FOLLOW YOUR HEART”, NO…. “LET THE HEART FOLLOW YOU ❤️”

“FOLLOW YOUR HEART”, NO…. “LET THE HEART FOLLOW YOU ❤️”

©️ Dr. Aparna Govil Bhasker

“Follow your heart and it will lead you to the right place!”

This is the advice that I have been doling out to my colleagues and juniors for as long as I can remember. This has been my own mantra in life too. I love what I do and I receive every new day as a blessing.

However, I recently started reading a book by the celebrated author- Cal Newport and that made me reflect a little more on this. I guess it’s high time for me to start reflecting… as almost fifty percent or more of my life has already passed by! 🙃

I am a very passionate doctor and a more passionate surgeon. There is not an iota of doubt that I love what I do and revel in the satisfaction and gratification that I derive from my chosen profession. And I can say with confidence that finally, it has all worked out well.

However, 25 years ago, when I first walked through the gates of my medical school, was it because of “passion” for medicine? Was I following my heart? I am not so sure. Well, for starters, back then, medicine and engineering were probably the two most coveted career options. That didn’t leave us with much of a choice unless you wish to include the “civil services” too. To add to that were my parents’ aspirations and especially my father’s, who was very hopeful that I will be a doctor some day. I also loved biology and thought that medicine would be the logical career progression, without realizing that studying the anatomy of frogs was a whole different world than dealing with patients. Ofcourse I cannot ignore the overarching influence of Bollywood where doctors were treated like God and their superpowers included diagnosing pregnancy by palpating the pulse of their patients 🙂 . I guess I also had the bare minimum IQ level to get through the entrance examination back in the days when there was no Kota and no Byju’s. Well, Kota did exist geographically but hadn’t achieved the fame levels of today! Then there was peer pressure, a competitive streak, an aspiration to be amongst the best students, some lofty ideals and the works…. So these were some of the reasons that kind of pushed me into the world of medicine and I am guessing many people would have had reasons similar to mine.
©️ Dr. Aparna Govil Bhasker

Was “passion” a part of this pot pourri of my reasons to become a doctor? Was I following my heart? Well I did think so, until recently. After reading this new book I thought about this a little more…..

25 years ago as elated as I was to get into medical school, I had less than zero idea about what I was getting into. Like many other medical students I have no doctors in the family. I had no exposure to a hospital. I had no idea whatsoever about what it takes to get through the decade-long arduous journey of under-graduation and post-graduation. Back then no one shadowed anyone. There was no way to find out what to expect. No one to warn how hard it was going to be. Ofcourse, once we enter the med school, reality does check in quite soon and we realize within months what we have signed up for. But as far as “passion” is concerned, I don’t think I had enough information to able to feel justifiably “passionate” about my chosen field.

It was hard in the beginning (med school can be quite daunting to start with) but gradually it also became fascinating. The deeper we delved into the mysteries of human mind and body, the more I started enjoying it. It still beats me how we could retain thousands of pages of medical literature in our minds and get through neverending torturous exams (I still get nightmares about those exams). Interacting with patients and being able to reach to a diagnosis would bring in another level of high. The excitement about the first delivery, first murmur, first suture, first surgery and the list of other marvelous firsts was endless. I guess I didn’t even realize when I fell in love with medicine and when passion slowly started creeping in and making its way. If wide- eyed is an expression to be taken seriously then I guess I was wide- eyed for pretty much most of the time and I guess I still am! Its almost magical to experience healing manifest so beautifully. I finally ended up being a bariatric surgeon and I guess a decent one at that. But was it a result of my passion for bariatric surgery? Absolutely not… because when I got into the thick of things, bariatric surgery was not even a thing in India.

So did I follow my heart or did my heart follow everything else that I did? I guess the point that I am getting to is that we probably need to learn to enjoy and put in our best efforts in whatever we do. Life is a series of surprises and many a times failing at something or not being able to get our own way, could be that hidden opportunity that may be leading us to our destiny. I discussed this briefly with some of my close girl friends and one of them rightly said that whatever we do must bring in fulfillment, it must contribute in a meaningful way and at the same time must lead to growth for us and those around us. It would be nice to be able to take educated decisions but not all of us are that lucky or pragmatic. Life can be unpredictable and has the potential to throw some pretty dark stuff at us. People who get to follow their passion as their life’s work are blessed. But people who turn their life’s work into their passion are equally blessed. At the end of the day it’s all about a “job well done”.

So, in conclusion, going forward, I am going to tweak my advice a little bit. “Don’t just follow your heart”, sometimes allow the heart to follow and add “passion” as a special ingredient in every chapter of your life! While cultivating a job for your passion is desirable, sometimes cultivating passion for your job may be equally fulfilling. The mantra to success was never simple but take each day as it comes. Love whatever you do and it will bring you a lot of happiness in return.

Cheers!

©️ Dr. Aparna Govil Bhasker

PS- The book I am reading is called- “Be so good they can’t ignore you” by Cal Newport

Learn to just be

Learn to just be

LEARN TO JUST BE Dr. Aparna Govil Bhasker It fills me with wonder when I look at the sky,Its a beautiful blue as far as I can see with my eye,Rays of the glowing sun peep through the clouds with silver lining,And pretty birds soar 

MY REFLECTIONS ON THE SEASIDE

MY REFLECTIONS ON THE SEASIDE

Endearing is the innocence of childhood that believes in the pure joy of creating castles of sand. Children don’t get demotivated when these castles are washed away by the waves of the sea. It is inspiring to see their enthusiasm about making another one the 

THE HELPLESSNESS OF THE HELPERS

THE HELPLESSNESS OF THE HELPERS

THE HELPLESSNESS OF THE HELPERS

The recent suicide by Dr. Anoop Krishna, a 35 years old orthopedic surgeon from Kerala brings to fore some very pertinent issues.

It takes decades of hard work to achieve a medical degree and many more decades to earn a reputation and goodwill in the society. Unfortunately, today all it takes is one surreptitious photograph or an offensive video for years of toil to go down in the drain. Character assassination of doctors to tarnish their reputation on social media is becoming increasingly common when the outcomes of treatment are not favourable.

Complications are a part of all surgeries and they are not the same as negligence.
We understand that for the concerned family it is difficult to come terms with the loss of a loved one. However, resorting to violence, character assassination and threatening, is completely uncalled for. As per IMA, almost 75%of doctors in India have faced some form of violence. 68% of this violence is caused by the escorts of the patients.

Losing a patient is never easy for any doctor too. Constantly working with sickness and death eventually takes an emotional toll. Increasing levels of stress in a doctor’s life is not only damaging to them but also to their spouses and families. In the case of Dr. Anoop Krishna a son lost his father, a wife lost her husband and the community lost a humane and talented doctor.

He scribbled the word “sorry” on his bathroom wall before he breathed his last. When one doctor is pushed to a suicide, hundreds are pushed away from medicine. And even a million sorries by the society will not be able to make up for this loss.

Dr. Aparna Govil Bhasker

A SURGEON’S PRAYER

A SURGEON’S PRAYER

©️ Dr. Aparna Govil Bhasker Dear people, every time I hold a knife in my hand to begin a surgery, I close my eyes and pray…. I pray that I am kind to you, who, lays in front of me, and I am as gentle